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Navajo Code Talkers visit Peterson

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Scot Brelend (left), retired Marine, shakes the hand of Bill Toledo (right), former Marine Navajo Code Talker, during a fundraising event at the Peterson AFB Base Exchange March 12. Of the more than 400 original Code Talkers who served during World War II, Newman is one of 20 Code Talkers still alive today. The Navajo language had few words for military equipment, so Code Talkers often described aircraft as different types of birds and ships as different types of fish. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. J. Aaron Breeden)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Scot Brelend (left), retired Marine, shakes the hand of Bill Toledo (right), former Marine Navajo Code Talker, during a fundraising event at the Peterson AFB Base Exchange March 12. Of the more than 400 original Code Talkers who served during World War II, Newman is one of 20 Code Talkers still alive today. The Navajo language had few words for military equipment, so Code Talkers often described aircraft as different types of birds and ships as different types of fish. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. J. Aaron Breeden)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Alfred Newman (left) and Bill Toledo (right), former Marine Navajo Code Talkers, pose for a photo during a fundraising event at the Peterson AFB Base Exchange March 12. Of the more than 400 original Code Talkers who served during World War II, Newman and Toledo are two of 20 still alive today. The Navajo language had few words for military equipment, so Code Talkers often described aircraft as different types of birds and ships as different types of fish. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. J. Aaron Breeden)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Alfred Newman (left) and Bill Toledo (right), former Marine Navajo Code Talkers, pose for a photo during a fundraising event at the Peterson AFB Base Exchange March 12. Of the more than 400 original Code Talkers who served during World War II, Newman and Toledo are two of 20 still alive today. The Navajo language had few words for military equipment, so Code Talkers often described aircraft as different types of birds and ships as different types of fish. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. J. Aaron Breeden)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Bill Toledo, former Marine Navajo Code Talker, signs a book during a fundraising event at the Peterson AFB Base Exchange March 12. Of the more than 400 original Code Talkers who served during World War II, Toledo is one of 20 still alive today. The Navajo language had few words for military equipment, so Code Talkers often described aircraft as different types of birds and ships as different types of fish. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. J. Aaron Breeden)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Bill Toledo, former Marine Navajo Code Talker, signs a book during a fundraising event at the Peterson AFB Base Exchange March 12. Of the more than 400 original Code Talkers who served during World War II, Toledo is one of 20 still alive today. The Navajo language had few words for military equipment, so Code Talkers often described aircraft as different types of birds and ships as different types of fish. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. J. Aaron Breeden)

Peterson SFB Schriever SFBCheyenne Mountain SFSThule AB New Boston SFS Kaena Point SFS Maui