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721st SFS conducts Smoke Grenade training at CMAFS

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - M18 Smoke Grenades are used as a ground-to-ground or ground-to-air signaling devices, for targeting or landing zone marking, or screening for unit maneuvering. The grenades are available with different color smoke options. During training, the grenades are thrown into a combustible free area and users ensure the smoke travels away from personnel. (Photo by Craig Denton)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - M18 Smoke Grenades are used as a ground-to-ground or ground-to-air signaling devices, for targeting or landing zone marking, or screening for unit maneuvering. The grenades are available with different color smoke options. During training, the grenades are thrown into a combustible free area and users ensure the smoke travels away from personnel. (Photo by Craig Denton)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Master Sgt. Crisanto Quinto, 721st Security Forces Squadron, noncommissioned officer in charge of training, pulls the pin and throws an M18 Smoke Grenade on Aug. 3, 2015 at Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station.  Once activated, the grenade produces a cloud of colored smoke for approximately 90 seconds. (Photo by Craig Denton)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Master Sgt. Crisanto Quinto, 721st Security Forces Squadron, noncommissioned officer in charge of training, pulls the pin and throws an M18 Smoke Grenade on Aug. 3, 2015 at Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station. Once activated, the grenade produces a cloud of colored smoke for approximately 90 seconds. (Photo by Craig Denton)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Personnel from the 721st Security Forces Squadron training section at Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station, review safety guidelines in preparation for M18 Smoke Grenade training on Aug. 3, 2015. The briefing provides personnel with instructions on how to properly operate and throw the grenade. The training is hands-on and allows each individual the opportunity to remove the safety pin, throw the grenade and watch the smoke discharged from the canister. (Photo by Craig Denton)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Personnel from the 721st Security Forces Squadron training section at Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station, review safety guidelines in preparation for M18 Smoke Grenade training on Aug. 3, 2015. The briefing provides personnel with instructions on how to properly operate and throw the grenade. The training is hands-on and allows each individual the opportunity to remove the safety pin, throw the grenade and watch the smoke discharged from the canister. (Photo by Craig Denton)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Senior Airman Delmekia Black, 721st Security Forces Squadron, unit scheduler/trainer, releases the spoon (handle on the side) as she throws an M18 Smoke Grenade during training at Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station on Aug. 3, 2015.  For safety purposes, it is important to throw the device into a combustible free area and stay upwind of the discharged smoke. (Photo by Craig Denton)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Senior Airman Delmekia Black, 721st Security Forces Squadron, unit scheduler/trainer, releases the spoon (handle on the side) as she throws an M18 Smoke Grenade during training at Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station on Aug. 3, 2015. For safety purposes, it is important to throw the device into a combustible free area and stay upwind of the discharged smoke. (Photo by Craig Denton)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Discharged M18 Smoke Grenades after hands-on training at Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station.  Expended canisters remain hot for some time after use and should only be picked up while wearing gloves.  Once activated, the grenade produces a cloud of colored smoke for approximately 90 seconds. (Photo by Craig Denton)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Discharged M18 Smoke Grenades after hands-on training at Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station. Expended canisters remain hot for some time after use and should only be picked up while wearing gloves. Once activated, the grenade produces a cloud of colored smoke for approximately 90 seconds. (Photo by Craig Denton)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Members of the 721st Security Forces Squadron, training section, carry expended M18 Smoke Grenades after hands-on training at Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station on Aug. 3, 2015. The training provideed a realistic and safe training experience for personnel. (Photo by Craig Denton)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Members of the 721st Security Forces Squadron, training section, carry expended M18 Smoke Grenades after hands-on training at Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station on Aug. 3, 2015. The training provideed a realistic and safe training experience for personnel. (Photo by Craig Denton)

CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN AIR FORCE STATION, Colo. -- The 721st Security Forces Squadron conducted M18 Smoke Grenade training at Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station on Aug 3.

The training enhanced wing-level exercises and provided a realistic hands-on training, said Master Sgt. Crisanto Quinto, 721st Security Forces Squadron, noncommissioned officer in charge, training section.

M18 Smoke Grenades are used as a ground-to-ground or ground-to-air signaling device, for targeting and landing zone marking, or as a screening device for unit maneuvering, said Quinto. The device contains a smoke mixture and a safety pin that must be removed. Once the munition is thrown, the spoon on the side detaches and initiates a delay element which activates the smoke.

"The initial training to use a smoke grenade is a one-time training and the 721st SFS training section is now certified to throw the M18," he said.

Conducting grenade training takes planning and preparation. The munitions are ordered days in advance and picked up on the day of training, Quinto said. In addition, the grenades must be picked up by two personnel and transported in the back of a government pick-up truck. Security forces personnel must notify several agencies prior to training to keep responders and communities informed about possible smoke accumulations.

The 21st Civil Engineer Squadron, explosive ordnance disposal flight is responsible for providing a safety brief before beginning the hands-on portion of the training. Participants learn about smoke grenade general safety, transportation, inspection, emergency procedures, and operation and use. During training, the grenades are thrown into a combustible free area and produce colored smoke, which can present a toxic hazard in high concentrations. EOD recommends using common sense and staying clear of smoke accumulations.

In addition to smoke grenade training, SFS Airmen receive Taser, expandable baton, combative and simunition training (dye-marking, non-lethal training similar to paintball).

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