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SBD 1 rolls out new TCCC first aid training

Service member learns how to apply a tourniquet

U.S. Air Force Tech Sgt. Thomas Eckard, 50th Civil Engineer Squadron, practices applying a tourniquet during the Tactical Combat Casualty Care training at Schriever Space Force Base, July 11, 2022. TCCC is a course that teaches service members to stop massive bleeding, conduct airway assessments, evaluate and identify respiratory distress, identify and treat for shock and prevent hypothermia. (U.S. Space Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaitlin Castillo)

Service members learn TCCC

U.S. Air Force Police officer Joshua Miller, 50th Security Forces Squadron civilian trainer, teaches Airmen and Guardians the proper way to apply a tourniquet during the Tactical Combat Casualty Care training at Schriever Space Force Base, July 11, 2022. Airmen and Guardians will also learn how to apply combat gauze, bandages and pressure dressings. (U.S. Space Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaitlin Castillo)

Service members learn TCCC

Airmen and Guardians from Space Base Delta 1 participate in the Tactical Combat Casualty Care training at Schriever Space Force Base, July 11, 2022. TCCC is replacing the previous Self Aid Buddy Care as the new standard first aid course. (U.S. Space Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaitlin Castillo)

SCHRIEVER SPACE FORCE BASE, Colo. --

The Tactical Combat Casualty Care training is replacing Self Aid Buddy Care as the new Space Base Delta 1 standard first aid course, July 1, 2022.

TCCC is a course that teaches service members to stop massive bleeding, conduct airway assessments, evaluate and identify respiratory distress, identify and treat for shock, and prevent hypothermia. Airmen and Guardians will also learn how to apply tourniquets, combat gauze, bandages and pressure dressings.

Studies show that approximately 50 percent of service members killed in action die from blood loss. TCCC allows military personnel to identify and treat casualties to improve chances of survival before reaching a hospital.

 “This training is reality based,” said U.S. Air Force Police Officer Joshua Miller, 50th Security Forces Squadron civilian trainer. “These skills can be used on deployments, at your home station and even off duty. The skills are simple and easy to implement.”

The training consists of a block of instructions including a slideshow and hands-on practices, which is followed by a scenario based evaluation where students have to apply everything they learned on a casualty.

Since February 2022, 43 Airmen and Guardian instructors and 155 service members have passed the TCCC course.

Peterson SFB Schriever SFBCheyenne Mountain SFSThule AB New Boston SFS Kaena Point SFS Maui